Excellent addition to the Marlowe collection

book

Only To Sleep by Lawrence Osborne

Book Review:  4 out of 5 star rating

At 72 years of age, Philip Marlowe has retired.  But when he’s offered a case by an insurance company, he decides to have one last adventure.  They want Marlowe to investigate the death of Donald Zinn.  They’ve paid Zinn’s widow a very large sum of money but something doesn’t seem right and they think Marlowe is the man to get to the bottom of it.

Who doesn’t know and love Philip Marlowe?  What a perfect delight to have an author such as Lawrence Osborne bring him to life once again.  The Robert Chandler Estate asked Mr. Osborne to write this book and they couldn’t have picked a better author to do the job.  Osborne has done a wonderful job of creating an older Marlowe.  And he has done an excellent job of depicting a man who has led an adventurous life but now is headed to a more sedentary life and all of the conflicting emotions that go along with that.  So enjoyable to once again join Marlowe as he takes on his last investigation.

This is a bit different from Mr. Osborne’s other books in that he adapts the Chandler style of telling this story.  But his particular talents still shine through.  He’s lived in many countries and has quite a knack for detailing each location that he brings his characters to.  Most of this book takes place in different locations in Mexico and the author brings his readers right there with him.  With all the sights and smells and colors, you’ll completely forget that you’re not actually there.  I do hope that one day Mr. Osborne will once again bring Mr. Marlowe out of retirement for another adventure.

Recommended.

This book was given to me by the publisher in return for an honest review.

 

Advertisements

Dig in and explore this literary work

book

The Family Tabor by Cherise Wolas

Book Review:  4 out of 5 star rating

Harry Tabor is about to be honored as Man of the Decade for his charitable works.  His family are on their way to his home to join him and his wife, Roma, who is a child psychologist.  His son, Simon, is a lawyer and will be bringing with him his wife and two young daughters.  His daughter, Camille, is a social anthropologist and his daughter, Phoebe, is a lawyer.  They’re all so proud of Harry and each of them have their own reasons for wanting this occasion to be a family-bonding one.

But Harry’s mind seems to have been playing tricks with him and hiding some vital memories.  Those memories start to resurface, helped along by a voice in Harry’s mind and even a vision or two.   As the memories increase, Harry’s jubilation at his upcoming honor starts to crumble.  Is he the honorable man he thought he was?  His children, whose lives seemed all so perfect, are also struggling with their own demons.  Simon can’t sleep at nights and has discovered a desire for Judaism, Camille is having career setbacks and has taken a job at a hospice and Phoebe has an imaginary boyfriend as she can’t face her family with her loveless life.  None of them are being truthful with each other or their parents.  Poor Roma knows her husband and children are having problems but can’t get them to confide in her.

I was completely blown away by this author’s debut book, “The Resurrection of Joan Ashby”.  While I can’t say the same about her newest effort, I did enjoy it.  It took me awhile to become invested with the characters and the writing was sometimes a bit too ponderous for me.   But I grew to care for this family very much.  I think Simon’s story touched me the most.  He was a good father and husband and his new-found desire to explore his Jewish roots should never have had the outcome it did.  I felt so crushed for him.  Roma took on the troubles of each of her loved ones and was such a true-to-life character.  As for the Man of the Decade, Harry, his journey in this book is definitely a compelling one.

I think the book may not be to everyone’s taste and that’s a shame because there are such wonderful literary tidbits throughout.  There’s no fast paced plot here and the writing can be a bit heavy at times.  But to those who like a book that you can dig into and explore like an archaeological excavation, I do recommend this one.

This book was given to me by the publisher in return for an honest review.

 

Can always count on this author for an interesting read

book

The Disappearing by Lori Roy

Book Review:  4 out of 5 star rating

Lane Fielding has returned home after twenty years to once again live with her parents.  She never wanted to return but her divorce was a hard one and she’s back with her two daughters, Annalee and Talley.  She’s not welcome in town since her father has for many years been suspected of abusing, and possibly killing, young boys at a nearby reform school.  Lane has her own mystery of what happened to her when she disappeared at the age of 13 years old that still follows her around.  Now another young blond girl has disappeared and the reporters are back in town.  The past will soon touch Lane’s fragile family in an even more frightening way.

I’ve read all of Lori Roy’s books and they never disappoint.  The author is very good at bringing her damaged characters to life and keeping her readers hooked.  This is a slow moving book, sometimes I thought it was a bit too slow but then it would pick up again.  I loved Lane and admired her efforts to be a good mother to the often difficult Annalee and the young vulnerable Talley.  Lane had a hard upbringing and she vowed to do better by her daughters.  She and her twisted family and their battle with their demons makes for an interesting story.  The past is never too far from the present.  This novel is apparently based on the real-life tragedy at the Arthur Dozier School for Boys in Florida.

Recommended.

This book was given to me by the publisher in return for an honest review.

An emotional roller coaster

book

Baby Teeth by Zoje Stage

Book Review:  4 out of 5 star rating

7-year-old Hanna is such a good little girl for her father.  But things are much different when she’s with her mother.  The little girl loves her father and feels he understands her.  She wants her mother out of the way – permanently.   Hanna has never spoken and though her parents have had many medical tests done, no reason for her muteness has been discovered.  Hanna’s mother, Suzette, has had a hard life.  Her mother was not the best to her and Suzette has vowed to do better with Hanna.  Suzette has also had a lot of medical issues and the stress due to difficulties with Hanna has brought Suzette to the breaking point.

This book is labeled as a thriller and at times I thought it was spreading into the supernatural genre and/or the horror genre.  But my take on the book is that the situation this family found themselves in was all too real, which made it all the more frightening.  This is a shocking story and at times it felt like it couldn’t possibly happen.  The battle of wits between this fragile mother and her young child was truly cringe inducing.   There is a scene towards the end of the book that completely brought me to tears.  The author does a fabulous job of keeping readers on an emotional seesaw.  One chapter had me thinking, oh, the poor little girl, and the next chapter had me thinking oh, the poor mother.  This was quite an emotional roller coaster of an experience.

This isn’t going to be for everyone and at times I wasn’t sure it was for me but then I’d start enjoying it again.  There are times when I felt like the young girl’s ability to manipulate and plan was unbelievable and I didn’t care at all for the foul language the mother used.  But it certainly kept up the tension and suspense.  Apparently the book has caused quite a bit of controversy and people are talking about it – a lot – so that’s certainly a plus for it.

Recommended.

This book was given to me by the publisher in return for an honest review.

 

Powerful, emotional read with a shaky start

book

School of Velocity by Eric Beck Rubin

Book Review:  4 out of 5 star rating

Jan and Dirk are teenage boys when they meet in the Netherlands.  Jan is studying the piano and dreams of a musical career.  Dirk has already had a career as a child actor.  Jan is a quiet boy, while Dirk is flamboyant and outgoing.  Jan soon is obsessed with Dirk and follows him everywhere.  To his surprise, Dirk seems to want to be with him and they soon become fast friends, with sleepovers where they watch porn.  They lose touch when Dirk goes to America to find his way to stardom and Jan stays in the Netherlands to go to music school.  They don’t see each other again until Jan becomes ill and reaches out to Dirk.

OK, I have to admit that I was turned off by the beginning of this book.  Dirk’s language and topics of conversation were sometimes a bit offensive and while young boys may think of only one thing – sex – it isn’t my preferred reading material.  Dirk’s character seemed to go quite a bit over board with his rebellious spirit although the adults unbelievably took it all in stride.  But I’m very glad I stuck with this book.  It really turned around after they each went off to pursue their adult lives and I became engrossed in the book.  It’s a beautifully written story about male friendship and quite sad.  I also enjoyed the author’s description of a musician’s life and the total absorption in the music.  The book leaves open quite a few questions and that’s fine with me.  I didn’t need this type of book wrapped up nicely.  It’s a powerful, emotional read and I don’t even want to start another book yet as I want to give this one some more thought for a while.

Recommended.

This book was given to me by the publisher in return for an honest review.

 

Very impressive debut novel

book

The Moment Before Drowning by James Brydon

Book Review:  5 out of 5 star rating

Capitaine Jacques le Garrec has returned to Paris in disgrace.  He was a hero in the French Resistance but now is facing charges of a terrible crime that occurred in Algiers, where he was working in the Army Intelligence Service.  While he’s waiting trial, he’s asked to investigate the unsolved murder of a local teenage girl.  The French town where this murder took place has a history of German occupation that has left its impact on the residents.  As le Garrec looks into the murder, his memories of what happened in Algiers often collides with the investigation.

I’m very impressed by this author’s debut novel.  It’s a short novel but Mr. Brydon packs in so much emotion, suspense, tension and heartbreak.  This story literally took my breath away and has left me shaken.  Be forewarned that this book is not for the faint hearted.  It’s a brutally violent book with graphic descriptions of horrendous torture.  Capitaine le Garrec is a broken man, torn apart by his work in Algiers.  The moral dilemma he’s faced with is a tragic one.   There was never a moment in this book that I wasn’t completely engrossed.  The ending was pure perfection.  This book will haunt me for some time to come.  This author is one to be reckoned with and I hope his next literary work will be published soon.

Most highly recommended.

This book was given to me by the publisher in return for an honest review.

 

 

Intelligent and profound

book

The Dependents by Katharine Dion

Book Review:  5 out of 5 star rating

Gene and his wife Maida and Ed and his wife Gayle have been close friends since college.   They raised their children together and took vacations at Ed and Gayle’s beach house.  When Maida dies, Gene re-lives their marriage and fears that it was not all that he had thought it was.  He has never been very close to his daughter Dary and now they seem even further apart.  He begins to doubt all of their relationships and a horrible suspicion begins to take root in his mind.  Things are further complicated when his daughter convinces him to hire a caretaker whom he’s drawn to.

The characters in this book quickly found a place in my heart.  This is a slow burning, deeply thought provoking, intelligently written book.  This author is a fearless one, ready to take on issues such as how well we know our loved ones, where does our happiness come from, how to deal with the loss of a loved one, how well we remember the past.   She uses great tact and caring in each sentence.   This author is a force to be reckoned with and I have great hopes for her future in the literary field with such an auspicious debut.

Most highly recommended.

This book was given to me by the publisher in return for an honest review.

Believable? Not really – but who cares!

book

Bring Me Back by B.A. Paris

Book Review:  4 out of 5 star rating

When the love of Finn’s life Layla disappears at a service station, he’s a suspect but is soon cleared though he hasn’t told the police the whole story.  His grief is shared by Layla’s sister Ellen and it brings them together.  Ten years after Layla’s disappearance, Finn and Ellen are engaged to be married.  But now signs start appearing that Layla may still be alive and not too happy about the upcoming wedding.

I really could not put this book down!  I enjoyed this author’s two previous books and this was no exception.  The author really knows how to ramp up tension.  It’s a short book and just flew by.  I never expected quality literature when I chose this one but Ms. Paris’ books are fun and entertaining and that’s all I ask for in a light thriller like this one.

Recommended for when you want a fun, fast read.

This book was given to me by the publisher in return for an honest review.

book pub

A new nightmare for motherhood

book

The Completionist by Siobhan Adcock

Book Review:  3 out of 5 star rating

In an America in the near future, there is little natural water and most is artificially engineered.  The people have technological portals embedded in their skin, which keep track of their every movement.  There’s a fertility crisis and those women who do become naturally pregnant are considered miracles but their independence is taken away from them and they’re fined for every small thing they do that isn’t within a certain code that has been set up to ensure the safety of these babies, a code that is practically impossible to adhere to.

Carter Quinn is a marine who has fought the battle to protect the engineered water and now has come home after 2 and a half years.  He’s obviously ill from the “triggers” used in battle.  His sister, Fred, has miraculously conceived and now has permission to wed.  She’s frantic due to the disappearance of their sister, Gard, a Nurse Completionist, one who helps women through their pregnancies.  Carter sets off on a quest to find Gard.

The author has created a unique and horrifying future world, yet doesn’t explain how we got to this point.  Apparently, the problem was in the water and therefore there is now a need to engineer water.  The main characters are each have their own distinctive voices and you can tell who’s telling the story or writing a letter just by their written voice, which I believe shows the author’s talent.  The characters are very realistic and down to earth and believable, except for Carter.  While I liked the guy, I found the character to be very frustrating.  Granted, he was ill from whatever was being used as a weapon in the war and was not thinking clearly.  But he was constantly drunk which just didn’t seem to go with his determination to find his sister.  The thought “you can’t be that stupid” came to mind too often.

The most problem I had with this book was that I found it to be very repetitious and far too drawn out.  Also it seemed to be very unrealistic that such a ridiculous child care code would be set up, which defeated the purpose of protecting these treasured unborn children.  But it was an interesting concept and I found it to be a horrifying world for women to live in.  Just the fact that women’s independence was so jeopardized by this situation compelled me to keep on reading.

This book was given to me by the publisher in return for an honest review.

 

An engrossing political fairy tale

book

The Melody by Jim Crace

Book Review:  4 out of 5 star rating

Alfred Busi is better known in his town as Mister Al, the singer/pianist.  But his venues aren’t as large as they once were and he’s in mourning for his much beloved wife.  He’s not keeping up his home very well and it’s getting a bit worn down.  He’s often awakened in the night by animals raiding the garbage cans in his courtyard.  One night upon hearing the noises in the courtyard, he ventures down to set things right.  He’s suddenly attacked – scratched and bitten – and he’s sure it wasn’t an animal but had the sense that it was a naked wild boy.  The report of the attack sets off a series of rumors of what’s living in the nearby woods and ignites fear and discord throughout the town.

This is a beautifully written tale of love and age and grief and reputation.  It’s slow moving but very compelling and unusual and poetic in nature.  It’s almost like a fairy tale or a dream that just carried me along in its flow.  For all its poetry, it’s also political and makes a strong statement against the prejudices that many of those who are more fortunate have against the homeless and poor.  The author is a past winner of the Man Booker Prize and I had read that he had retired from writing but then came out with this book.  I’m glad he did and am looking forward to reading more of his work.  This one will long remain in my memory due to its distinctiveness.

Recommended.

This book was given to me by the publisher in return for an honest review.